Adamus: The male form in contemporary art

Adamus, an art exhibition looking at the representation of the male form in contemporary art, will be hosted at the Bookshop Gallery, Hoxton and opens on Friday 27 April 2012. The exhibition will feature the artists Matteo Merla, Ian Thompson and Joáo Trindade.

Art by Ian Thompson, Matteo Merla and Joáo Trindade

In Adamus, the artists Matteo Merla, Ian Thompson and Joáo Trindade, each explore the male form in their own unique and contrasting style. Each artist takes their lead from the classical practice of masters such as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo and the strong examples of their representations of the male form. Drawing on the inspiration of this classical heritage, each proceeds to represent the male form in their own unique and contrasting chosen contemporary settings.

Matteo Merla, a painter and sculptor who lives and works in London, studied at the internationally acclaimed and historically prestigious Accademia di belle Arti di Brera, Milan. In addition to drawing heavily on his classical roots, Merla is also inspired by both Greek and Roman mythology. These are the elements that inform both the narrative and motifs of his paintings. Merla is a regular exhibitor on the burgeoning East London/Shoreditch art circuit.

Ian Thompson is an internationally collected painter and potter. He divides his time and practice between the UK and France. Thompson’s contribution to Adamus comes from his Memories of the Body series inspired by his reading of Memories of the Body: Tales of Desire and Transformation, a collection of short stories by the writer Lisa Tuttle. Interestingly, Lisa Tuttle’s reputation is as a feminist writer and Thompson injects this irony into his series of pieces focusing on the male form. Thompson’s work was recently selected and shown in the Royal Watercolour Society’s annual competition, which took place at the Bankside Gallery  in February 2012.

Joáo Trindade, who studied and began his artistic practice in his native Portugal before moving to London, has exhibited across the globe. Trindade’s contribution to Adamus is a collection of classically vibrant anatomical studies juxtaposed against a background of contemporary and equally vibrant geometric scapes.  In 2011 Trindade’s work was selected by the Saatchi Gallery to form part of their exhibition stand at Art Paris , the modern and contemporary art fair at the Grand Palais Paris. In 2010 his work was part of the Sketchbook Project Tour, which toured numerous states across the USA.

Adamus is on from 27 April to 13 May 2012 at the Bookshop Gallery Hoxton, 83 Kingsland Road E2 8AG (Google map), which is a short walk from Hoxton Overgroung station. The exhibition’s preview evening is on Thursday 26 April 2012, from 6 to 9pm. To attend the preview evening please RSVP galleriaclic@gmail.com, inserting Adamus RSVP as subject.

Sign up to GalleriaClic’s mailing list to get notifications and updates on this and future art events.

Advertisements

About GalleriaClic

This is the blog of Galleria Clic contemporary art online gallery edited by Depo Olukotun.
This entry was posted in GalleriaClic, GalleriaClic artists, Matteo Merla and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Adamus: The male form in contemporary art

  1. charliepi says:

    see you at the opening

  2. charliepi says:

    Really interesting show. Three very different takes on the male body, JOAO’S use of muscle diagrams with electronic forms and a beautiful use of colour should be presented during the Olympics and Ians picture brought to mind the Magic Realism of Angela Carter, but that might be just my obsession.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s